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IS SMOKED MARIJUANA MEDICINE? THE SCIENCE REMAINS HAZY… science, evidence, blog, madras
  • The chemistry of medical marijuana is not known and not reproducible.
  •  There is a lack of evidence of safety for the use of marijuana under medical supervision.
  • There is a lack of evidence of efficacy of medical marijuana.
  • Qualified experts do not accept the drug.
  • Scientific evidence is not widely available.

 If you have a medical problem, chances are, there are far more effective treatments than smoked marijuana; prescribed treatments have undergone meticulous testing procedures to minimize risk. Though some may be disappointed, today’s smoked marijuana should not be confused with real medicine. Smoking and inhaling a large array of chemicals in order to deliver a drug is a backward step in medicine and a risky step for a patient.

Simply put, marijuana is not a pure compound; there is no way to make sure that ingredients are measured reliably and are consistent from one batch to another. ...

“Pot used to be pretty harmless, but it’s plenty dangerous today” blog, Doctors, mental health, addiction

Increased availability and decreased perception of harm drive youth use and lowers the age of initiation to drug use — the goal of an industry working to capture lifetime customers, despite known consequences for physical and mental health.  Youth exposures double the risk of addiction.

Seattle's post-marijuana legalization crime wave crime, Washington, blog


By the end of 2014, the number of total crimes was 24 percent higher than in 2012. Property crimes increased 14 percent from 2012 to 2013, and the 2014 data was 26 percent higher than the pre-pot legalization period.

 

Does medical marijuana work? The answer is (mostly) “no” and “we don’t know” blog, medcine, legalization

In conclusion, if the states' initiative to legalize medical marijuana is merely a veiled step toward allowing access to recreational marijuana, then the medical community should be left out of the process, and instead marijuana should be decriminalized. Conversely, if the goal is to make marijuana available for medical purposes, then it is unclear why the approval process should be different from that used for other medications.

Substance Use Carries Mental Health Risks—Yes, Even Marijuana blog, Nami, SAMHSA
Why Giving Pot Pushers Access to Our Banks Is Dangerous stimson, blog, banking, Vaping, HR 1595, SB 1200, talking points
The House of Representatives is about to consider a bill called The Safe Banking Act, which, like many titles of federal laws, is completely misleading. 
It should be called the “Let’s Pretend Marijuana Is Safe and Give Pot Pushers, Cartels, and Terrorist Organizations Access to Our Banking System” Act. 
Don’t hold your breath for a title change. Regardless of the title, the idea behind the act ignores reality and, if passed, will lead to disastrous results.
This bill is all about protecting people and businesses who openly commit federal crimes by selling marijuana, and rewarding them by giving them access to the most important banking system in the world to further give them the patina of legitimacy.
And at the same time the House is considering this bill, the data on the impact of the legalization experiment across the country is proving just what a dangerous and bad idea legalization has become.
The Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area report on the impact of legalization in Colorado is devastating for those pushing pot. The report found:
·          Traffic deaths where drivers tested positive for marijuana increased 109%
·         Traffic deaths involving drivers who tested positive for marijuana more than doubled between 2013 and 2018
·         The percentage of all Colorado traffic deaths that were marijuana related increased 15% in 2013 to 23% in 2018
·         Marijuana use in the past month for children ages 12 and up increased 58%, and is 78% higher than the national average
·         Adult marijuana use increased 94%, and is 96% higher than the national average
·         The yearly number of emergency room visits related to marijuana increased 54% after legalization
·         Marijuana-related hospitalizations increased 101% after legalization
·         Suicides where toxicology results were positive for marijuana increased from 14% in 2013 to 23% in 2017

The report also shows that the tax revenue from state-authorized marijuana sales, far from being a game-changer like pot pushers said it would be, amounted to around nine-tenths of 1% (000.9%) of Colorado’s fiscal year 2018 budget. Previous reports are just as bad. 

Pot Is a Schedule I Controlled Dangerous Substance for Good Reason

Passed in 1970, the Controlled Substances Act places marijuana in Schedule I, a category reserved for drugs that are medically unhelpful and dangerous. Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse, have no currently accepted medical use in treatment, and a lack of accepted safety for use even under medical supervision.

The fact that the act was controversial when it was adopted, and the debate over the proper treatment of cannabis has not quieted down since then, does not negate the fact that as of today, marijuana is on Schedule I.

As Heritage Foundation scholars have written elsewhere, Congress would be irresponsible to move marijuana out of Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act without hearing from the nation’s finest scientific minds. 

States have passed so-called medical marijuana laws under the theory that pot has medicinal benefits that can’t be produced by other legal means. In making those claims, pot pushers want us to ignore the fact that today’s marijuana is one of the most genetically modified substances on the earth, has over 500 known carcinogens, has THC levels that dwarf the 1% or 2% levels from the 1970s (levels are now at 20-90% THC), and that there is zero quality, content, or dosage control in their products. 

They are also counting on you not knowing that there are already three FDA-approved THC drugs, and at least five more on the way.   

The dirty little secret they hide from you is that you don’t have to smoke marijuana, eat it in a brownie, or chew it in a marijuana-laced gummy bear to reap the medicinal benefits of THC. A doctor can write you a prescription for those drugs. They can’t write one for marijuana, because it is not a medicine

The three FDA-approved drugs are Marinol, Cesamet, and Syndros. Drugs like Syndros show great promise for countering today’s dangerous “medical marijuana” movement. The companies that sell those FDA-approved drugs do, and should have access to the federal banking system. But those who peddle pot, with sky-high genetically manipulated THC levels that have no medical benefit, shouldn’t.

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