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Title Tags Notes View result counter
Impacts of Alcohol and Marijuana on Driving AAA, alcohol, driving, Impairment 1
Freshman Year Alcohol and Marijuana use Prospectively Predict Time to College Graduation and Subsequent Adult Roles and Independence. college graduation, alcohol

Abstract

Objective This study examined how freshman year substance use prospectively predicted time to college graduation, and whether delayed graduation predicted postponed adoption of adult roles and future substance use. Participants Participants were part of a longitudinal study that began in 2004. The first analyses focused on freshman year (N = 2,050). The second analyses corresponded to a subset of participants at age 27 (N = 575). Methods Measures included self-reported substance use, adult role adoption, and university reported graduation dates. Results Results indicated that frequent binge drinking and marijuana use during freshman year predicted delayed college graduation. Those who took longer to graduate were more likely to have lower incomes and were less likely to obtain a graduate degree. Taking 5-6 years to graduate was associated with greater likelihood of alcohol-related problems. Conclusions Findings support the importance of interventions during freshman year of college to decrease substance use and promote timely graduation.

 

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Say no to booze in groceries HB-81, alcohol, 2017 Legislation, miller

Ask any Florida legislator if their phone has been ringing off the hook from constituents who can't get enough vodka or rum, and they would have to say "no." Then why are they pushing hard liquor into our grocery stores without public input or backing?
 
It appears the driving force behind this change are corporate executives at big box stores who will profit greatly. They don't care about Florida families and are too cheap to spend money building a separate entrance. The current separate entrance policy allows for ID verification at the door along with cameras monitoring every corner, provides an avenue to prevent underage drinking, and protects our friends in recovery from making an impulse purchase. Does anyone want our children growing up with liquor as part of the food shopping experience?
 
Binge drinking or excessive alcohol use is responsible for 88,000 deaths in our nation, and Florida is ranked third in the nation for fatal DUI crashes. Only 16 other states allow this type of distribution. Thirty-four states do not allow hard liquor to be mixed with grocery items.
 
Other than creating a one-stop shopping experience that includes alcohol, I can't think of any reason for passing this bill. Our state doesn't need it and the public, the few who are aware of this proposed change, don't want it.
 
Teresa Miller, Tampa

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Excessive Alcohol Use Preventing a Leading Risk for Death, Disease, and Injury alcohol, CDC

Excessive alcohol use accounts for 1 of 10 deaths among working-age adults in the United States.

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2015 Crash Report Florida alcohol

2015 Stats: Hillsborough County reported 66 alcohol crash fatalities up from 56 in 2014 (17.86% increase) This is the highest number of fatalities in the state. #2 Orange and Duval both 55, #3 Miami Dade 53
Hillsborough also #1 in alcohol-related injuries: 993 and #1 alcohol related-crashes: 1,469
Let's compare next year when legal marijuana hits our highways!
 
 

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Mixing Alcohol and Marijuana alcohol, Marketplace

What research there is suggests that using alcohol and marijuana together can intensify the effects of both. Alcohol has been shown to increase the level of marijuana’s main psychoactive ingredient, THC, in the blood stream. (1)  With increased heart rate and lowered judgment, driving and other activities can be very dangerous. As a person consumes more of either pot or alcohol, they are less likely to think rationally about how much or what they are consuming. 

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Marijuana or Alcohol: Which is more harmful? alcohol, harm, Potency, Pharmacokinetics, powerpoint

PowerPoint Presentation comparing Marijuana & Alcohol,

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Alcohol and Cannabis AAA, alcohol, Metabolism, Impairment

Alcohol and Cannabis

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AAA Marijuana, Alcohol and Driving AAA, driving, alcohol 9
Healthy Alcohol Market alcohol, Legislators 10
Persistent Cannabis Dependence and Alcohol Dependence Represent Risks for Midlife Economic and Social Problems: A Longitudinal Cohort Study alcohol, addiction, Studies

Our data indicate that persistent cannabis users constitute a burden on families, communities, and national social-welfare systems. Moreover, heavy cannabis use and dependence was not associated with fewer harmful economic and social problems than was alcohol dependence. Our study underscores the need for prevention and early treatment of individuals dependent on cannabis. 

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Adolescent substance use and educational attainment: An integrative data analysis comparing cannabis and alcohol from three Australasian cohorts alcohol, adolescent

Adolescent cannabis use increased the odds of non-progression with formal education.

  • Associations for adolescent alcohol use were inconsistent and weaker.
  • Cannabis use accounted for a greater proportion of the overall rate of educational underachievement than alcohol use.
  • Findings inform the debate about the relative harms of cannabis and alcohol use.
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Adolescent substance use and educational attainment: An integrative data analysis comparing cannabis and alcohol from three Australasian cohorts alcohol, youth usage

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Where There’s Smoke … youth, Colorado, college, Potency, legalization, alcohol

Marijuana use by kids between the ages of 12 and 17 is 58 percent higher in Colorado than the national average, according to the RHMIDTA. The rate of use among college-age adults is 54 percent above the national average. Drug-related suspensions from Colorado schools jumped 34 percent from the 2005-2009 period to the 2010-2014 period, while alcohol-related suspensions stayed flat.
 "Everything they said would happen has not," says Gorman. "They said alcohol use would go down. Alcohol use went up. They said it would eliminate the (marijuana) black market. We are the black market. The trends show that legalization is not working."
 

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The Futile Search for the “Right” THC per se Level alcohol, driving, impaired

THC is a large, fat-soluble molecule whose concentration in the blood rapidly drops as it is sequestered into the body’s fat stores, including the brain.  Immediately after smoking a joint, the THC level will be very high in the blood and very low in the brain.  The THC level in the brain climbs rapidly at the same time that as it is declining in the blood.  At some point, the concentrations cross, and the concentration continues to rise in the brain while it is still declining in the blood, since the brain acts like a sponge, soaking up the partially insoluble THC from the blood.  

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Mental Illness alcohol, drugs and gun violence guns, alcohol

These findings have profound implications for crafting policy to avert future tragedies. In the wake of mass shootings, politicians from both sides of the aisle often call for including better mental health records in background checks. Though a worthwhile sentiment, the evidence suggests that these efforts would be better spent focusing on alcohol abuse instead.

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Official: Cannabis use impairs driving as much as alcohol says first of its kind study while drug's legality continues to spread car crashes, alcohol, impaired

A National Institute on Drug Abuse study tasked stoned participants with driving a highly sophisticated driving simulator.
 
Researchers found that after their blood levels of THC reached a certain point, the drivers weaved similarly to a driver with a BAC of .08
 
The study also found that combining cannabis and alcohol decreased motor skills even more than just one or the other 

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Which is worse? Alcohol or Pot alcohol, Infographics 18
Research Shows That Any Dose of Alcohol Combined With Cannabis Significantly Increases Levels of THC in the Blood alcohol, Research, vehicle

Experts agree, however, that the combination of cannabis and alcohol raises the chance of crashing more than either substance by itself. In a study of 1,882 motor vehicle deaths, the U.S. Department of Transportation found an increased accident risk of 0.7 for cannabis use, 7.4 for alcohol use, and 8.4 for cannabis and alcohol use combined.

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Alcohol and Marijuana- Infographic alcohol, Infographics 20
Emory study shows increased adult marijuana use and binge drinking in states that legalize medical marijuana alcohol, binge drinking, Studies

Researchers from Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health found an increase in adult marijuana use and binge drinking after the implementation of medical marijuana laws (MML) in ten states that permit marijuana use for medical purposes.

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Autopsy: Ulele server accidentally drowned in Mango Lake Death, car crashes 2, alcohol, Florida, tampa

The autopsy showed Foster had a .098 milligrams-per-liter level of THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, the intoxicating ingredient of marijuana. Pearson said that is a significant level.
“That indicates very recent use,” she said. “I would say she used marijuana within a half-hour or an hour before she died.”

 

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Pot, alcohol found at scene of fatal teen wreck Teens, Fatalities, car crashes, Florida, impaired, alcohol

#no2pot

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Behavioral Health Trends 2014 Survey SAMHSA, health trends, alcohol, illicit drugs

Marijuana Use
As noted in the illicit drug use section, an estimated 22.2 million Americans aged 12 or older in 2014 were current users of marijuana. This number of past month marijuana users corresponds to 8.4 percent of the population aged 12 or older.  The percentage of people aged 12 or older who were current marijuana users in 2014 was higher than the percentages from 2002 to 2013. This rise in marijuana use among those aged 12 or older may reflect the increase in marijuana use by adults aged 26 or older and, to a lesser extent, increases in marijuana use among young adults aged 18 to 25 compared with the percentages of young adults who reported marijuana use in 2002 to 2009.

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August 2014- Legalization of MJ Impact Colorado Colorado-0, youth, car crashes 2, Death, exposure, alcohol 25
Comparing Alcohol and Marijuana: Seriously alcohol, Research, youth 26
Pot-Booze Combo More Dangerous for Teen Drivers Than Alcohol Alone car crashes 2, alcohol, pot

Teens who drank and smoked pot at the same time were 90 percent more likely to get a ticket and 50 percent more likely to be in a wreck.
 

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Use of Alcohol, Cigarettes, and Marijuana Before Age 16 Associated with Higher Rates of Substance Use Dependence alcohol, addiction

Furthermore, early users of all three substances were more than twice as likely to meet the criteria for marijuana dependence (21% vs. 8%).

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Driving Under the Influence, of Marijuana DUI, Impairment, alcohol

A highway safety official in Colorado, where marijuana is legal, said that “a lot of people don’t think D.U.I. laws apply.”

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Pot Fuels Surge in Drugged Driving Deaths car crashes 2, impaired, alcohol, Colorado-0

Cannabinol, a remnant of marijuana, was found in 12.2 percent of those deceased drivers during 2010, (up from 4.2 percent in 1999). Pot was the most common non-alcoholic drug detected by those toxicology screenings.

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Six - State Study Finds Drugs Other Than Alcohol Increasingly Detected in Fatally Injured Drivers; Cannabinoids Most Prevalent Other Drug Detected alcohol, car crashes 2, traffic, Fatalities 31
Alcohol vs. Marijuana Chuck Norris, School, alcohol 32
Teen shoplifting, liquor a bad mix alcohol

Several Capital High School students agreed with Graham’s assessment, " that teens are taking advantage of it being easier to shoplift liquor" than beer or wine.

“You’re not an automatic suspect when you walk in a grocery store,” said one student interviewed Tuesday in the school parking lot.

“We’re only catching a small percent of what’s happening,” Graham said. “We are not getting all of the alcohol-related incidents referred for criminal charges.”

School officials and police have said they are concerned that the store’s liquor is sold in the same aisle as soft drinks and energy drinks where students congregate.

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Doubly illegal: Qualitative accounts of underage alcohol access through theft alcohol, ncbi

In addition to 9% of respondents who reported stealing alcohol from commercial outlets themselves, a total of 26% respondents reported occasions when their close friends stole alcohol. Our findings unveiled that teens had a body of knowledge that some drew upon for stealing alcohol. Youths revealed detailed knowledge about store layout, theft protection devices and store policies. In particular, respondents disclosed knowledge about which aisles have blind spots, how to remove security tops on bottles, and no-chase policies.
 
As one 17 year old female described: “in a liquor store the cashier’s gonna be watching you and in a big supermarket it’s more open. [...] it’s just some open place and there’s no one around, you can just steal it more easily than in a small business.”
 
Youths also reported knowing the layout of large commercial stores, in particular the locations of security cameras and blind sports. Youths used blind spots to slip a bottle of alcohol into a pocket or backpack unnoticed. A 17 year old boy discussed how he and his friend strategized: “We had a whole system. As it turns out, the only aisle in every store that doesn’t have security cameras is the pet food aisle. So my friend looks really old, and I’d have the backpack. He’d go and he’d grab the handle [1.75 liter liquor bottle], walk into the pet food aisle, put it into my backpack and we’d walk out.”

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Decriminalization would increase the use and the economic and social costs of drugs. legalization, usage, social costs, alcohol

In fact, the benefits of keeping marijuana and other illicit drugs illegal clearly outweigh the negative and predictable consequences of legitimizing these substances.
Our position is simple and evidence-based: both decriminalization and legalization of illicit drugs would increase their use, along with their associated health and social costs. Unless advocates of decriminalization or of outright legalization can establish that more drug use is a net good for society, both arguments are self-refuting.
Higher prices help hold down rates of usage.

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THE EFFECT OF CANNABIS COMPARED WITH ALCOHOL ON DRIVING alcohol, driving

Cannabis and alcohol acutely impair several driving-related skills in a dose-related fashion, but the effects of cannabis vary more between individuals than they do with alcohol because of tolerance, differences in smoking technique, and different absorptions of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient in marijuana. 

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Mixing Alcohol And Marijuana Increases Impairment In Drivers alcohol

Marijuana, even in low to moderate doses, negatively affects driving performance in real situations. While previous research on alcohol effects alone show that alcohol at BACs around .10 is far more impairing than low or moderate THC doses alone, marijuana does impair driving performance. Drivers would be less than normally able to avoid collisions if confronted with the sudden need for evasive action. The effect of combining moderate doses of alcohol and moderate doses of marijuana resulted in a dramatic performance decrement and levels of impairment, as great as observed when at 0.14 BAC alone.

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